Starting a Law Firm, Moving to a New State

Starting a law firm can be tough. Trying to build your new law firm can be even tougher. Starting a law practice completely from scratch in a new jurisdiction could be fatal.

Many times, people starting their own law firm will leave an old firm with a bevy of client who they had represented under the old firm’s moniker. This is a perfectly acceptable way to start a new law practice. It is done many times and it will continue to be done. Think about it – if you already have a client base (or “book of business”) intact, you don’t need to worry so much about marketing and client development. Your only real worries initially are setting up a new corporate structure, a new office and the vagaries that go with that, malpractice insurance, and general institutional kind of work. Don’t get me wrong, that isn’t easy, but it appears much more doable when you know you have clients who are going to pay for those things.

However, moving to a brand new state with no clients AND trying to start your own law firm, is a whole different ball game. Not only do you have to worry about the institutional kinds of things every lawyer starting a law firm has to worry about, you also need to worry about how you are going to pay for this stuff while you build a client base. The very idea of it would discourage even the most ambitious man.

This article is not meant to discourage, though, it is meant to enlighten. When moving to a new state to start a law firm, you, of course, must be licensed in that particular jurisdiction first. Once you are licensed, the game is essentially on. The name of the game is marketing – something nobody teaches you in law school. (As an aside, this is where a joint MBA/JD degree would really come in handy).

So, how do you market your new law firm when you are moving to a new state? Simple, you get out there and hustle-n-flow. Another name for it is “networking”. In order to be successful in any business, let alone starting a law firm, you have to network and create a network. After all, starting a law firm is all about people and connections. Your clients connect with you. You connect with the court and court staff, including the judge or jury. Your business colleagues connect with you. How do you connect, again, get out there with your name and do good work. Be organic. Plant a seed and make it grow. Sound tough? It is.

It takes time and effort and failure. One of the hardest things an entrepreneur is faced with is failure. But, failure can be a good thing if you make it work for you instead of against you. An entrepreneur learns from failure and turns it into a positive. Life is about experiencing, learning, and failing – and then getting back up again.

So, if you think you have it in you to accept failure and keep on truckin’, you may be ready to move to a state and start and build a law firm.